Archive for the ‘Pebble Tile’ Category

Standing River Rock Tile

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

What makes a waterfall, pool, or wall so interesting to look at?  It is the nuances of the water movement over the stones. The easiest way to create that is pebbles that are tiled on to it. So how do they do that?  Well, it is actually very simple.  They used Standing River Rock tile like the ones shown here:

Standing River Rock tile is really easy to install and it looks really great on walls, waterfalls, pools, and the like.  Many companies choose to use this tile in their front office either in front of the Reception Desk or actually as part of the reception desk.  Standing River Rock tile has been used on bathroom walls, in showers, and on backsplashes.  There are many colors and types to choose from.  From black to tan, you can get a color that matches any room.

When choosing a Stacked Pebble Tile there are different ‘looks’ you can get for you project.  First is the traditional pebbles shown above.  The second is a flat mosaic pebble shown here:
Standing Pebble Tile Mixed Quartz Double Standing Pebble Tile Desert Brown Double
It is a good idea to get a sample of both types of Standing River Rock tile before you buy so you can check out how they will look in your space and on the wall of your choosing.  This tile works great outdoors or indoors.  After you seal it it will stay looking great for years to come as river rock pebble tiles are so durable and weather resistant.  Now that you know how to get the look of standing river rock tile, don’t hesitate to check out our selection of Standing River Rock Tile!

If you have any questions please feel free to ask us anything.  We would love to serve you with anything you need for your project using standing river rock.

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Majority of U.S. Homeowners Believe Now is a Good Time to Renovate, Houzz Survey Finds

Friday, March 29th, 2013
Largest-ever Study of Home Remodeling and Design Reveals Top Drivers, Challenges and Spending for U.S. Renovation Activity

Palo Alto, Calif., March 27, 2013 — Significantly more U.S. homeowners are moving forward with renovation projects compared to this time last year, according to the second annual Houzz & Home survey that garnered more than 100,000 responses from the Houzz community of 14 million monthly unique users. A majority of the homeowners surveyed also believe now is a good time to remodel (53 percent), and 58 percent of those planning projects in the next two years will hire professional help. The study also found that three-quarters of homeowners believe that now is a good time to buy a home. Together with last week’s Commerce Department report showing the rate of single-family home construction at its highest level in four and a half years, the results of this study point to a strengthening economy, housing and renovation market.

The 2013 Houzz & Home survey is the largest survey of remodeling and decorating activity ever conducted, covering historical and planned projects, the motivations behind these projects, and the impact of the economy on home building, renovation and decorating plans among Houzz users across the United States and around the world. The study yielded detailed data at the national, regional and metropolitan area level, which Houzz used to examine regional differences in priorities and spending.

The number of homeowners who say they will delay their projects because of the economy has dropped to 45 percent from 52 percent last year, and homeowners are more likely to cut back in other areas, such as vacations and other big ticket purchases, rather than delay or decrease budgets for their home plans. While improving the look and feel of the space is still the key driver for recently completed projects (83 percent), the number of homeowners who remodeled to increase their home value has increased to 54 percent from 47 percent in 2012.

“We’ve collected an unprecedented volume of data from the community, and we are pleased to share the synthesis and findings with everyone looking to renovate or decorate their home,” said Liza Hausman, vice president of community for Houzz. “This data will enable us to empower the community with powerful resources they can use to make better decisions around building, remodeling and design projects.”

Bathrooms and kitchens top America’s renovation project list again this year, with 28 percent of respondents planning a bathroom remodel or addition, and 23 percent planning a kitchen remodel or addition in the next two years. In terms of dollars spent, kitchens command the lion’s share. Over the last five years, nearly four in ten home improvement dollars have gone into kitchens and survey data indicates future spend is likely to follow the same trend.

Over the last five years, homeowners on average spent $28,030 to remodel their kitchens, however spending varies widely at different budget levels. Homeowners spent an average of $54,942 nationwide for a high-end kitchen, $22,390 for a mid-range kitchen, and $7,133 for a lower-budget kitchen.

The study also found that homeowners renovating at the higher-end were more likely to go over budget than those doing more modest renovations, though a significant number reported going over budget at all project levels. Fifty-six percent of those doing a high-end renovation, 42 percent of those who did a mid-range renovation, and 31 percent of those whose renovation was lower-budget also spent more than expected on their projects.

Other Key U.S. Findings:

  • Spending more time in a room does not necessarily correlate with decorating dollars. Homeowners report spending the most time in their family/TV rooms, but not the most money there. Nobody was willing to admit to spending significant time in their bathroom – but apparently the time we do spend there is worth significant investment. The percentage of money spent on kitchens and bathrooms far exceeds the percentage of time spent in these spaces.
  • A majority of the homeowners surveyed who are planning to complete a project in the next two years will hire a general contractor (58 percent), and a third a kitchen/bath (36 percent) or carpet/flooring professional (34 percent). Twenty-three percent plan to hire architects and 22 percent interior designers.
  • When it comes to hiring a professional for their project, 67 percent of homeowners surveyed rated a “personality I can work with” as a 5 (very important) on a 5-point scale.
  • 34 percent of U.S. homeowners cited making their home more energy efficient as a key driver for completing their most recent project.
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Pebble Tile Flooring

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

A house needs to be aesthetically pleasing on the inside and out. From the ornaments, to the walls, ceilings and floors, every part of your living place should complement each other and be as comfortable and attractive as possible. Houses that have floors that are in good condition are visually pleasing and invite a feeling of calm regardless how few other decorative elements are within the room. Floors that are poorly kept, full of stains, and are chipped make rooms look unsightly despite how grand the theme of your house is.

Ceramic tiling is a popular option if you are planning to remodel your floor. They are easy to clean and come in a huge selection of patterns and colors. However, they are quite fragile and become slippery when wet, thereby increasing the chance of accidents taking place. They are also very common and so can give your house that Track Home feel. If you are going to go in that direction, there are some very unique and more durable versions of ceramic, porcelain tiles. These are much more distinctive and durable and as such a more viable option.

Another option you might have in mind is to use hardwood tiling materials. Because of its naturally beautiful finish and timeless look, a lot of homeowners are using this type of tile. On the downside, hardwood floors are subject to fading, do not hold moisture, and can easily be scratched. If you have pets, it isn’t advisable to use this kind of tile. Ask anyone who has  kids or pets who has had hardwood ( typically engineered) for any time and they will express regret.

There is no truly indestructible tile, even natural stone; so it is up to you to decide what type of tile fits your needs. You must always keep in mind that for every condition, there is a different type of tile that is suitable for the job. Nonetheless, there is one type of tile that has the qualities of durability, versatility, and style in one.

Pebble tiles have long been used as floor tiling since the time of the ancient Greeks. They are so durable that even under extreme duress they survive. In fact there are ruins of homes with pebble floors  which still stand today. The ease in pebble tile installation is also worth appreciating since a homeowner does not need professional skills and expensive materials. In fact, it is up to the homeowner”s imagination on how he would like to install them. Most of all, the greatest quality it possesses is the comfort it gives to the person walking barefoot on it. Unlike ceramic glazed tiles and hardwood, the pebble tiles mimic a light foot massage with its natural texture. With or without grout, pebbles are properly sorted so that homeowners are assured that the thickness is consistent enough to create a level surface. It”s as if you”re getting a free spa treatment just by walking across the room.

Java pebble tile shower-Design-4-Less

Java Pebble Tile Shower Spa

As much as spas are concerned, pebble tile floors create a relaxing, tropical hotel appeal, once they are installed. The islands of Indonesia, where the largest supply of river pebble stones come from, benefit from the export of world-class pebble stone tiles. However, some people think that environmental destruction is an issue to be concerned with. This is definitely not true. More legal jobs are actually created and the stones are collected from shallow bedrock in the mountains so there is no negative environmental effects.

So if you are looking for a very durable and unique flooring material that will also enhance the interior design of your home then consider pebble tile.

Amber Pebble Tile Master Bath

Stunning master bath using Amber Pebble Tile

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New Pebble Tile Blends Just Released to Design Community for the Hottest in Modern Design

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

After years of working with top interior designers and architects who specialize in working with pebble tile, Natural Stone Outlet has created 5 exciting new pebble tile blends. Formulated from their most engaging and best selling colors series, the blends are defining the vogue pallets of today’s design. They have developed these gorgeous styles specifically for design professionals looking for exotic and enticing modern elements.
Kandui Blend Pebble Tile
With engaging names from the unique islands of Indonesian, where these stones are mined by local artisans, names like Kandui and Timor evoke images of sandy beaches, swaying palms and luxury accommodations fronting azure waters. Which is certainly appropriate, as these pebble tiles are definitely the types of finishes you would expect to find in exotic boutique hotels at desirable venues like Hawaii, the Caribbean or Tahiti. In fact, many fine hotels like Starwood have used pebble flooring for venues like their Westin Kaanapali Resort Villages or their Sheraton Rum Fire in Waikiki.

Ubud Blend Pebble Tile

These exciting new blends join and already vibrant lineup of pebble tiles that are meticulously made by local by local artisans. Premium pebbles are sourced from local family owned quarries on various islands from Indonesia and brought to Bali. The pebbles are then sorted for color, size and thickness and then puzzled into a interlocking patterns. The result is a uniform tile that when installed creates a seamless field of pebbles that is smooth and level to walk.

Commercially, pebble tiles have been used from foyers to feature walls and in fine restaurants to relaxing exotic spa facilities. For homeowners looking to gentrify a tired property, the pebble tile blends offer a great opportunity to incorporate new interior design finishes that are all natural, ecologically friendly, exotic, modern and serene.

Created for capturing a tropical, beachside ambiance and providing the warmth of natural stones for classic craftsman or  mountain rustic homes, the pebble finishes definitely make an appealing visual statement. These tiles are ideal for a stunning feature wall, dramatic backsplash, a unique shower pan or for adding a dynamic splash of exotic color. Fresh from the tropics, pebble tiles are the newest and freshest in design inspirations and are sure to provide a “Wow” in any project.

Available initially for a limited release as the company builds their California and Florida based inventories, a spokesperson says they have generous stock of the Pebble Tile Blends for sampling and should be able to accommodate all orders immediately.

Natural Stone Outlet may be contacted at info@naturalstoneoutlet.com and 1-888-848-4537

Timor Blend Pebble TileJava Blend Pebble Tile

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diy project: sculptural paper orb lights

Tuesday, May 1st, 2012

I found this great diy project via Design Sponge. It is inexpensive, creative and the results are simply fabulous! I will be making my own this weekend, so excited! =)

Materials

  • 100–125  white standard-sized paper cupcake liners
  • 100–125  vertically striped petit fours papers
  • (1) 18–20″ white paper lantern
  • hot glue gun
  • 1 Hemma Cord from IKEA (for lighting) ($3.99)

Instructions

1. Assemble the lantern and place it top up in a wide, shallow bowl to act as a base.

2. Put a small dot of hot glue on the backside of a white cupcake liner. Starting about 1/2″ in from the wire ring at the top of the lantern, place the cupcake liner on the lantern and press until it is attached.

3. Continue around the ring, spacing the papers so that the circular bases are approximately 1″ apart, allowing the outer edges to merge and shape.

4. Apply the cupcake papers around the lantern in rings until you are 3/4 of the way down, and then flip the lantern over and gently place it back in the bowl, top side down.

5. Complete the underside, and fill in the bottom so that the papers cover the base opening.

6. Begin applying the petite fours papers, centering them inside each white paper. Three-quarters of the way up the lantern, flip it top side up. Complete the top side.

7. Go back through, gently manipulating the outer papers to the desired shape. I kept mine fairly organic.

8. Drop a light in, and voila!

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So are you dying to try a stencil?!

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

I came across this great post from our friends at I heart Nap Time about stenciling. If you haven’t heard of Royal Design Studio you have been missing out! They have fabulous stencils in an array of shapes and sizes that are so easy to use! I have been dying to try this at my own home! I heart Nap Time put the stencils to the test and the results are fabulous! Below you will find the process they followed to achieve this look:

Tools

I started out with the fabric damask stencil, roller foam brushes, painters tape (which I later replaced with duck tape), stencil adhesive and lots of paper towels.

Basically what you will do is spray your stencil with spray adhesive and then tape it to the wall (lining it up correctly). Then you’ll roll the brush in the paint. Make sure to roll some of the excess paint off onto the paper towels before rolling the brush onto the stencil to avoid bleeding.

I SO wish I had a picture of me and my husband trying to tape up the stencil the first time around. It was pretty hilarious. I was trying to hold the stencil standing on a little stool, as my husband tried to tape it up. We could not get that stencil to hold for the life of us. Our textured ceilings were making it very difficult. My neck and arms hurt so bad…. we gave up! The next night I gave it another try and decided to use duck tape. Our ceilings are so textured, that the painters tape just wasn’t cutting it. Once I got the stencil up with duck tape it really wasn’t too bad. So if you have textured wall use DUCK TAPE! ;)

Process

The hard part was trying to piece the patterns together.  I love this stencil because it gives you so many different marks to line up. It was a little difficult looking straight up trying to find the little marks…however, I’m sure it would have been A LOT easier if I was looking straight at it. Once I did a few stencils and got the hang of it, it really wasn’t that bad. I would paint one stencil, take a break for ten minutes while the paint dried and then move onto the next. I did this over two nights. I’m not going to lie… my arms and neck were hurting by the end of the night! LOL!

Final Result

However now that is is done I am in LOVE! It has already opened up that tiny space and added so much personality. Doesn’t it look so awesome?! I love how it turned out! I’m already dreaming up what to stencil next.

Final Result

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Eco Design Find!

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

Im loving the new Stria Storage Collection from West Elm. It is made from reclaimed hardwood. With facades crafted from reclaimed saal wood, the Stria Storage Collection brings rustic charm to the bedroom. In a former life, the wood was used in Indian railway trestles. Today, it’s prized for its natural imperfections and character; no two pieces are exactly alike.

• Reclaimed solid saal wood drawer fronts.

• Frame made of mango wood, acacia and engineered wood.

• Drawers open on smooth metal glides.

• Wipe clean.

The best part? The price! West Elm is running a special $254.00 – $849.00

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How to fix dents in wood floors & furniture!

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

I was on Apartment Therapy’s Blog and ran into this useful article about fixing dents in wood, with an iron! So helpful, I would have never thought about this easy solution. Thank you for this great DIY fix Apartment Therapy!

Oak 1.jpg

Many years ago a teacher told me that you could steam out a dent in a piece of wood (one where the wood fibers had been compressed, not a where they had been removed) using a wet rag and an iron.

This technique was meant for unfinished wood, but unfortunately, most of the wood we deal with in our homes has some sort of finish on it. With some research I learned that this technique can work with finished wood but it depends greatly on the type of finish you are dealing with. So I decided to do a couple of tests to see the results for myself.

NOTE: BE CAREFUL! SOME FINISHES MIGHT TURN WHITE WHEN EXPOSED TO STEAM. PLEASE TRY THIS IN A HIDDEN AREA BEFORE DOING IT IN A VISIBLE PLACE.

The first test was a on a birch table from IKEA. Although this technique works better on new dents I decided to try to steam out a dent that had been there for quite a long time.

Here is what I did:

1. Wet the dent
2. Apply a wet cloth or paper towel
3. With the iron on High apply the iron to the wet paper towel or cloth and make a circular motion, don’t keep it in just one position as this might burn the surface of the towel. Make sure there is a lot of steam being generated. Do this for a few minutes and check your results. In my case I did this for about 3-5 minutes.

Birch 1.jpg

Birch 2.jpg

Birch 3.jpg

The dent came up almost completely and there was no damage to the finish!

My second test was on our hardwood floors. I found a dent that was pretty deep. I followed the same steps as above.

Oak 1.jpg

Oak 2.jpg

Oak 3.jpg

Although the dent came up, the surface of the finish had been broken and some dirt had gotten in side the cracks. If you know what type of finish you are dealing with you might want carefully sand the area and reapply the finish.

Oak 4.jpg

In the spirit of this experiment I tried sanding and got most of it out. Then I applied some Tung Oil that I had at home. It’s probably not the same as the original finish but the area certainly looks better than before. Here is my result:

Oak 5.jpg

Has anyone else given this method a try? Have any other fixes to recommend? Please share your smarts in the comments…

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7th Street Residence

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

Located in the East Village, this contemporary duplex apartment was designed by Pulltab Design. The clients requested that the 2, 400 sq ft space be renovated with unique architectural additions. What the clients wanted to achieve was a warm, open environment with unique detailing throughout. Some of the finishes selected in the space include Steel, Bronze, Stained Concrete, American Black Walnut and high gloss lacquer surfaces. The Living Room / Dining Room area are the heart of the apartment, a stunning planted garden wall was designed to create a focal point between both spaces. This garden wall is accented by a shallow reflecting pool below, which is designed to serve as an irrigation system. Simply Stunning!

7th Street Residence

7th Street Residence

7th Street Residence

7th Street Residence

7th Street Residence

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Domino Magazine Fans Rejoice!

Thursday, February 9th, 2012

For those of you that were heartbroken like me when Domino Magazine was shut down, I’ve got great news! Conde Nast has decided to bring back a special print edition of the magazine called Domino Quick Fixes. This publication will be a compilation of the magazines best home decorating tips, tricks and design stories. The publications will focus on the best ways to dramatically change the look of your home without breaking the bank. Domino Quick Fixes will be a great tool for anybody looking to create something unique in their space. Domino Quick Fixes will be available on national newsstands from April 17 through July 16 2012, for $11.00.  A second special edition scheduled for the Fall. Can’t wait!

Domino Magazine

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