Posts Tagged ‘Green Flooring’

11 Ways to Go Green in your Kitchen and Bathroom

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Follow these simple steps to an environmentally-conscious home:

BATHS


1. Fix a drip.
Drip, drop, drip, drop. That leak in the bathroom sink is not just annoying. It’s costing you loads of cash in water and energy bills and wasted gallons. Get it fixed ASAP, and if you can’t get the plumber scheduled right away, use this old trick: Tie a string on the faucet and allow the drops to dribble silently down into a cup or small bowl. Use the collected H2O to water your houseplants.

2. Get clean.
Avoid using harsh chemical cleaners in favor of natural cleansers (soap, water, vinegar, baking soda). You’ll do a favor for the environment and yourself.

3. Be water wise.
Low-flow toilets have come a long way. New models max out at 1.6 gallons of water per flush, but the very latest models can use even less.

4. Be water wise some more.
Tankless water heaters are a great energy saver. There’s no reason to keep a giant tank of heated water at your beck and call all day and night. Bonus tip: Go the extra mile when you turn on the shower by placing a bucket or other container under the showerhead. In the few moments it takes for the water to heat up, you can gather enough for the dog’s bowl and the houseplants. Don’t waste a drop!

5. Smell Sweet.
Cut down on harmful chemicals and gasses released into your home by using low- or no-VOC paints when giving the bath, or any other room, a fresh color.

KITCHENS


6. Be water smart.
A simple hardware store doo-dad called an aerator on your kitchen (or bath) faucet cuts down on water consumption, sacrificing very little if any water pressure. For less than $15, you can install one of these yourself and save up to 500 gallons per year.

7. Vent a little.
Proper ventilation in the cooktop hood of your kitchen keeps bills down and air quality up.

8. Think small.
The kitchen is the energy gobbler of the home. If you’re planning a remodel, building new, or just replacing an old appliance, remember that bigger isn’t always better. In addition to looking for energy-efficiency ratings on your new purchase, consider going for a smaller model that uses less energy to begin with. Bonus tip: New drawer-style dishwashers help cut back on water use for smaller loads.

9. Lighten Up.
Opening up a kitchen with skylights and windows that allow natural sunlight to stream in not only helps your mood stay perky, it is a natural, free way to light your space. No budget to add windows? At least let the light in by removing heavy, lightblocking window treatments.

10. Divide and Conquer.
Dedicate a little space for recycling bins or bags to make living green convenient for the whole family. You can purchase color-coded units with separate compartments and lids, or create your own recycling center with inexpensive bins from the home center or discount store.

11. Go, greens!

Try your hand at going green by growing herbs or salad greens in the kitchen. Bringing in a natural element adds some coziness to your home’s busiest room, and naturally cleans the air you breathe. (And of course, nothing beats adding your own fresh basil to that pasta at the dinner table.

Source: www.hgtv.com http://www.diynetwork.com/remodeling/11-ways-to-go-green-in-your-kitchen-and-bathroom/index.html

Written by: Suzanne Morrissey

By PointClickHome.com

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Floor Tiles 101

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Not all floor tiles are created equal. Each type has pros and cons that need to be considered when planning a tiling project. Here are seven popular popular varieties, find the right fit for your flooring needs:

Marble Tile

Marble

Real marble tiles have a beautiful, unique look like no other surface, with all their whirling patterns and shade variations. But the same patterns that make marble beautiful can be a real headache to match from tile to tile. To ensure that patterns match, the Marble Institute of America recommends having your contractor lay out the tiles over the entire surface before installing so you can approve the result. All your tiles should come from the same original batch. Marble, like most stone tiles, has high maintenance requirements. It must be sealed and cleaned regularly; for cleaning, use only a mild detergent solution or a product specially designed for marble. Never set your drink down on a marble surface (it will leave a ring), and wipe up any spills immediately, as they can stain or etch marble’s porous surface.

Terrazzo Tile

Terrazzo Tile

Terrazzo is traditionally a flooring material made by exposing marble chips in a bed of concrete and then polishing until smooth. Now, however, you can buy terrazzo in tile form. It’s often used in public buildings because it’s long-lasting and can be refinished repeatedly. Terrazzo is quite slippery and can cause falls, so it may not be a good flooring choice for families with young children or elderly members. Ask your contractor about applying non-slip additives to the surface.

Concrete Tile

Concrete

Concrete is a tough man-made mix of stone, sand, water and cement. It’s long-lasting, water-shedding, hail-resistant and can be made to mimic the look of other building materials. It can be a good roofing choice for harsh climates. Because it requires specialized tools and knowledge, and because you must ensure that the structure being covered can withstand the weight, concrete tile should be installed by trained professionals only.

Terracotta Tile

Terra Cotta Tile

Terra cotta is one of the oldest tile materials around, dating back before the birth of Christ, when it was sun-dried rather than oven-fired. It’s often used, glazed or unglazed, to create a rustic, weathered look. While high-quality terra cotta will last forever, it’s difficult to assess the quality, even for pros. Buy only from a seller whose reputation you trust, though even then you may encounter problems. For practical uses, it should be sealed, particularly in kitchens.

Porcelain Tile

Porcelain

Actually a subtype of ceramic tile, porcelain bears a perception of high quality, but for residential applications its particular toughness is unnecessary. It’s nonetheless popular in the residential market because the manufacturing process makes for unlimited design potential. The problem is that do-it-yourselfers typically install it with setting material designed for ordinary ceramic tiles, but porcelain’s low porosity means it requires a special compound for setting. Ask the manufacturer—not a salesperson—how to install it.

Ceramic Tile

Ceramic

Ceramic tiles are thin slabs of clay or other inorganic materials, hardened by oven firing and usually coated with some kind of glaze. Ceramic is best known for its durability, with some installations in the ruins of ancient Rome and Egypt still intact. Ceramic tile is a great choice for kitchens and bathrooms because it’s easy to clean and doesn’t harbor germs. It’s manufactured in production runs; because of variation among lots, make sure the caliber number (indicating size) and lot number (indicating color) are the same throughout your order. Ceramic tile is rated from zero to 5 based on hardness. Zero through 2 is suitable for wall tile, 3 is good for most residential uses, and 4 and 5 are hard enough for commercial applications.

Slate Tile

Slate

Slate tile is a popular roofing material with an air of prestige and a reputation for longevity. Although individual tiles sometimes crack, an entire roof made of slate probably won’t have to be replaced for 50 years or more. Properly installed, slate also makes dependable flooring. Slate is a metamorphic rock with relatively weak bonds between layers, so tile made from it tends to split along those planes. For an installation to resist damage, it must be set on a solid surface with mortar.

Special thanks to our friends at HGTV for this informative article!

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Amazing Glass Homes!

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

I found this interesting article by John Giuffo of FORBES about amazing glass homes throughout the world. Can you imagine living in one of these unique spaces? So cool!

Almost everything inside this Milan, Italy home is made of glass.
Photo: SantambrogioMilano

There are a few good rules of thumb to follow when owning and living in a house made of glass, and they don’t just involve throwing stones. Don’t play baseball in the front or backyard, don’t build a glass home near a golf course, and, most importantly, don’t forget to stock up on a supply of industrial-sized Windex—you’re going to need it.

Skyscraper architect Philip Johnson left a legacy of impressive buildings and skyscrapers, such as the Sony Building in Manhattan and Madrid’s improbably angled Puerta de Europa. But it’s his Glass House, in New Canaan, Connecticut, that is his most famous.

“Sure, it’s just a box of clear glass in the woods, but that simplicity makes this 1949-era house stand out as particularly beautiful,” says Rich Beattie, executive online editor at Travel + Leisure.

Some glass abodes enjoy their wooded nooks, as the surrounding foliage allows for privacy, a notion with which all glass houses play. Case Study House #22 (also known as The Stahl House) takes a different approach, and, due to its location atop the mountains surrounding Los Angeles, opens itself up to the city skyline below. The home, designed by Pierre Koenig, was a product of Arts and Architecture magazine’s 1945 project to inspire famous building designers to create modern and affordable homes for G.I.s returning from the war.

Ultimately, the project was abandoned, deemed a utopian idea that ultimately proved impractical. It did, however, leave behind some beautiful “experiments.” Visitors are allowed to view the privately owned home on weekends.

As Philip Johnson designed his glass home, Mies van der Rohe was contemporaneously at work on his glass-walled Farnsworth House, situated outside Chicago. His work reportedly greatly influenced Johnson’s final vision. The resulting home, the Farnsworth House, located in Plano, Illinois, is located nearly 55 miles outside of the Windy City.

The single-room window retreat, reminiscent of Johnson’s style, and has become so famous and influential that it was named a National Historic Landmark. Originally commissioned by Dr. Edith Farnsworth, who worked with van der Rohe on the designed and approved the final plans, the home was eventually the subject of a lawsuit first brought by van der Rohe and later countered by Farnsworth. Rumor has it that it wasn’t the home that drew her litigious ire upon completion, but rather the souring of a relationship with van der Rohe.

Read on for more about the Farnsworth House and four other amazing glass homes:

Church Point Home
Location:
Pittwater, Australia

The Church Point Home, outside Sydney, resembles a tree house.
Photos: Utz Sanby

This hill-perched transparent home plays peek-a-boo through the trees, but for the most part, rocks and foliage nestle it in complete privacy. Located near the ocean in Pittwater, about 30 miles north of Sydney, the Church Point Home was designed by Sydney architectural firm Utz Sanby. The firm describes the home on its website as a tree house that offers “seclusion and sanctuary” to its residents.

Concrete pillars made to look like trees support the house on its hillside seat, much like limbs act as a tree house’s supports, and though the home can seem muted with a majority grey-and-white color schemes small bursts of red strategically assert themselves inside and out. Hardwood floors and a wooden kitchen table set help harmonize the home with its forest location.

Philip Johnson’s Glass House
Location:
New Canaan, Connecticut

Johnson’s home is surrounded by art that he and his partner collected.
Photos: Philip Johnson’s Glass House

Used as the famous architect’s “Glass House Retreat” (he died there in 2005), the building was originally designed as a home. Johnson preferred to use it for the 58 years he lived after building it. Johnson’s lifelong partner, David Whitney, helped design the surrounding landscape and was responsible for collecting the art that the couple amassed. Thirteen other modernist buildings occupy the land, adding to the famous couple’s art collection.

Glass Home By Santambrogio
Location:
Milano, Italy

The Milan glass home is being replicated in Paris.
Photos: SantambrogioMilano

If you have the funds, architect and glass designer Carlo Santambrogio will design for you almost any glass structure you can think of. But it is his Glass Concept Home, located in Milan, which is perhaps his most impressive architectural feat – one which is currently being replicated in Paris. A blue-tinged glass cube sits in the middle of a wooded clearing – a location private enough to reasonably place a home that is made almost entirely of 6 to 7 millimeter glass (the material can be specially heated during the winter).

“After the client requested it,” says Santambrogio, “I came up with the project idea.” Almost every feature or piece of furniture is made from glass as well, from the dining room table, to the stairs, to the bookcase. In fact, one of the few items not made of glass is the bed. Seems glass is just not comfortable to sleep on, even with a great comforter.

Case Study House #22 (The Stahl House)
Location:
Los Angeles, California

The Stahl home is the result of a post-World War II project.
Photo: 2012 Stahl House

Arts and Architecture magazine had an inspired idea in 1945: to commission a variety of homes from some of the best architects of the day as a way of designing efficient and modern homes for troops returning from WWII. From 1945 – 1966 (with some gaps in between) a total of 25 homes were built (11 projects were never completed) and Case Study House #22 remains one of the most impressive.

Built on a cliffside overlooking the city, the home designed by Pierre Koenig, was completed in 1959, and the Stahl family, which still owns the home, moved in. Views from any area of the house (except for one wall facing the road, which provides privacy) take in the expanse of the whole valley, and guided tours of the home, while possible during the day, are most stunning at night. Tours are available and admission varies.

Farnsworth House
Location:
Plano, Illinois

The Farnsworth House is a straight line of glass.
Photos: Farnsworth House

Modernist German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe has had more influence on the architectural identity of Chicago than any other architect. The Farnsworth House, located 55 miles southwest of Chicago, is a fine example of his penchant for straight lines, steel and glass materials.

It was commissioned by Dr. Edith Farnsworth in 1945, who wanted to use the one-room glass shelter as a weekend retreat. Designated a National Historical Landmark in 2006, the Farnsworth house is essentially one large series of floor-to-ceiling mirrors, with a steel roof and support beams holding it in place. Today, the house and its grounds are now a popular backdrop for wedding ceremonies.

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Malkus Residence, Encinitas CA

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011

This contemporary and harmonious home is located in Encinitas CA. This house incorporates the best of contemporary design to create a informal, casual, comfortable and welcoming space. It’s the perfect place for relaxing and enjoying life. The house is designed in modern style and is both a quaint coastal property and a chic contemporary dwelling. I had the opportunity to work with the owner of this beautiful property one on one, together we meticulously hand selected every single surface in the home, from the porcelain used on the floors and walls, glass mosaic backsplahes, Compac Quartz Countertops, stainless steel & glass mosiacs, and the various light fixtures. We wanted to create a simple, streamline design in every space. The interior design is white and clean with subtle blue hues, which is pleasing to the eyes. There is a lot of natural light inside that in combination with a selective amount of furniture makes rooms very airy. We used modern materials, furniture and personal art to make this home a real urban oasis. I have to say it is great working with clients like these, who know exactly what they want but give you creative freedom as a designer. With a contemporary atmosphere that is refined yet down to earth, this property is one of the best projects I have been involved in. The result? A beautiful, modern, calm, contemporary space that is truly breathtaking! Enjoy!

*A second home of similar design is currently under construction on the same property in Encinitas on Neptune Avenue. The house is for sale with an estimated completion date of Spring 2012. For more details, please visit www.1501neptune.com

Mlakus Residence, Dining Room

Malkus Residence, Guest Bathroom (Sage Green 1x2 Glass / Broadway White Porcelain)

Malkus Residence, Jack & Jill Bathroom (Stainless Steel 1x2)

Malkus Residence, Jack & Jill Bathroom (Stainless Steel 1x2)

Malkus Residence, Master Bathroom (Otago Black Marble)

Malkus Residence, Kitchen (Ocean Grey 3x6 Subway)

Malkus Residence, Living Room

Malkus Residence, Fireplace (Linear Broadway White Porcelain)

Malkus Residence, Hall Bathroom (Otago Black Marble)

Malkus Residence, Hallway ( Linear Broadway White Porcelain)


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The Riviera Residence: Modern & Eco-Friendly!

Friday, September 9th, 2011

The Riviera Residence is modern, eco-friendly and so gorgeous! The home designed by Shubin + Donaldson, is located in Santa Barbara California. Situated on a ridge, the near-perfect location commands a 270-degree view of the Pacific Ocean, a dramatic canyon, and the Santa Ynez mountains. This relatively small house has all of the elements of a 5,000- or 6,000-square-foot house in a tidy, 3,200-square-foot package. The three-level home and two-car garage include open living/dining area, kitchen, master bedroom and bath, guest bedroom and bath, home gym, powder room, two home offices with office bath, outdoor dining area, outdoor lounge areas, lap pool, and 1,400 square feet of lower-level storage. Though not immediately obvious, this house embraces several characteristics of environmentally sustainable design. The basic design strategy is to site the house based on solar orientation, resulting in passive solar gains throughout the year. Photovoltaic power generates household electricity through a 2.8kw system (when power is not needed, it feeds back into the grid). A passive roof-top solar heating system provides for domestic hot water and a passive solar ground-level hot-water system is used to heat the pool. The natural flow of hot and cool air is fortified by the use of radiant hot-water floor heating and separate central air conditioning in the ceilings. Although these systems are in place, they are rarely used because of the solar orientation of the home and the natural ventilation. Shubin + Donaldson re-used the existing foundation and caissons. During construction, the existing house was taken apart piece-by-piece, with all usable elements donated to Habitat for Humanity. Other energy-saving systems include double-pane windows, UV-resistant glass, ample insulation, and energy-efficient appliances. Deep exterior overhangs are designed to provide shade in the summer, and let in sun during the winter. STUNNING!

The Riviera Residence

The Riviera Residence

The Riviera Residence

The Riviera Residence

The Riviera Residence

The Riviera Residence

The Riviera Residence

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Cork Mosaic Tile….So cool!

Thursday, July 7th, 2011

Cork Tile from Portugal is sustainable for a number of reasons. Firstly, it is rapidly renewable, being that the bark of the tree is peeled from the trunk, and then tree is left to regenerate. This provides an almost limitless supply of cork bark, assuming that once the tree is beyond its’ useful life, replacements are planted (which they are). This heavily protected species also carries with it tremendous mechanical and functional properties, most of which are related to the fact that the cork bark is made almost entirely of cellular pockets of air (200 million cells per cubic inch). These cells of trapped air inhibit the passage of sound (making it one of the best acoustic insulators known), and are known as a thermal insulator, separately an often cold floor from the warmth of your foot. In addition, cork is anti-microbial, has tremendous “bounce-back” properties and forgiveness, and offers one of the greatest slip resistances of any natural material. Despite common wine industry myths, cork availability increases every year (despite minor ups and downs related to weather), and is one of the true really sustainable raw materials in its unaltered state. Post-industrial wine corks are cut into 1/4″ pieces. The resulting discs are affixed to a durable and flexible paper backing, and are then ready for installation. As with tile and stone mosaics, Cork Tile is affixed to the substructure (subfloor or wall), with either a thin set or glue, and is then grouted.

Cork Tile is very versatile. Cork Tile comes either prefinished with 2 coats of a water-based urethane, or unfinished, which can then be stained any color. Not only can the color of the cork be customized to suit any aesthetic, but there are dozens of grout choices to create your unique look. Any standard “sanded” grout can be used with Cork Tile.

Cork Tile can be used in any traditional flooring application, as well as in “wet” applications such as in showers, saunas, and pool surrounds. Due to the stability of cork, its inherent impermeability, and the fact you are taking a resilient product and adding to its stability and durability with grout, the result is a product which is durable and versatile. It can be used in almost any interior finish application, however demanding the environment.

Technical Data:

Manufactured with rapidly renewable raw material

Minimum 30% rapidly renewable material in Coconut Tiles

Coconut Tiles are manufactured using wood from sustainably managed forests.

  • Dimensions: 12” x 24”
  • Sq. Ft. per tile: 1.82
  • LEED Pts:
    • MR 4 (Recycled Content- 30% to 40% recycled, post-industrial)
    • MR 6 (Rapidly Renewable Material)
    • IEQ 4.4 (Low Emitting Material)
  • Also achievable with installation:
    • IEQ 4.1 (Low Emitting Materials: Adhesives and Sealants)
    • IEQ 4.2 (Low Emitting Materials: Paints and Coatings)

Cork Mosaic Tile

Cork Mosiac Tile

Cork Mosaic Tile Installation

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Selecting the Right Bathroom Flooring

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

Check out this great article on “Selecting the Right Bathroom Flooring” by our friends at HGTV.

When choosing the right flooring for a bathroom, there’s more to keep in mind than personal style. Some very specific factors come into play: Is your flooring, for instance, impervious to water? Will it stain easily when makeup takes a spill? Is it safe when walking across with wet feet? Given those considerations, here are some of the top contenders in bathroom floor surfaces:

Ceramic Tile: Ceramic floor tile differs from, say, wall tile in that it’s designed with more of a texture to prevent slippage. It is typically between 1/2-inch to 3/4-inches thick, and measures anywhere from 4 x 4 inches to 2-feet-square. In addition to squares, other shapes are available, including octagonal and hexagonal. And mosaic tiles (2 inches square or smaller) come in pre-mounted fabric mesh sheets. Ceramic tile is available in a vast variety of colors and patterns; plus, you can take your creativity to yet another level with colored grouts. This type of flooring is durable and hygienic, but make sure that you pay close attention to the porosity rating; it’s critical in a space such as a bathroom that requires something that’s moisture-proof. The porosity classifications range from impervious (the least absorbent) to vitreous, semivitreous and, finally, nonvitreous (the most absorbent).

Ceramic

Laminate: Made of layers of materials literally bonded together for strength — resin, wood fiber and Kraft paper, for example — laminate flooring is compacted under pressure to create the final product, which is then transformed into planks. In fact, the surface of a laminate plank is actually a photographic image, printed from film onto a thin decorative layer, which is in turn protected with a wear layer. The high resolution of the film results in a realistic appearance, so laminates may appear to be a variety of other materials; wood grain is one of the most popular. And because it’s durable and easy to clean, laminate flooring a logical choice for bathrooms.

Laminate

Hardwood: Part of hardwood flooring’s charm is that it lends a sense of warmth to your bathroom. Plus, if hardwood is your flooring of choice throughout the rest of the house, you’ll create a cohesive look. What’s more, even worse-for-the-wear hardwood floors can be given a fresh outlook; you can stain or paint to complement the rest of the room’s decor.

Hardwood

Natural Stone: Cut into tiles, typically 12 inches square or larger, stone is easy to care for and durable, but it does require a strong subfloor. It also has the potential to be slippery when wet, especially in a polished form. As an alternative, however, stone can be honed (ground flat but not polished) or textured (by sandblasting); keep in mind, though, that unpolished forms may require a sealant to prevent stains. And one more word to the wise if you opt for a stone floor: Keep a pair of slippers handy as it tends to be cold underfoot.

Natural Stone

Vinyl: Long one of the most popular choices for bathroom applications, vinyl comes in sheets or tiles. Sheet vinyl comes in rolls that are 6- or 12-feet wide, providing a seamless look. Vinyl tiles, on the other hand, are typically 12 to 18 inches square and lend themselves to a variety of different patterns. Tiles are usually easier to install, and it’s simple to replace just one, if need be. On the downside, though, a vinyl tile installation has many more seams, which creates more places for germs to grow. Both options, however, are easy to clean and effectively resist stains and moisture.

Vinyl

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Fabulous Cork!

Thursday, May 12th, 2011

Cork tile has quickly become one of my favorite items! It is not only unique but eco friendly as well. Cork Tile is a wood based mosaic made from cork harvested from the cork oak trees in Portugal. Cork Tiles are made from 100% post industrial cork; they come either prefinished with 2 coats of a water-based urethane, or unfinished, which can then be stained any color. Its not only eco friendly but a natural thermal insulator with great acoustic properties! Cork Tile can be used in any traditional flooring application, as well as in “wet” applications such as in showers, saunas, and pool surrounds. Can’t wait to use this on one of my projects! Check out these cool installations:

Cork Floor: Bathroom

Cork Floor: Restaurant

Cork Tile: Stairwell

Cork Tile: Bar

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Recycled Leather For Your Floors by Ana Morales

Friday, January 14th, 2011

While it is unusual to conceive of leather for flooring, recycled leather tiles are gaining popularity in the interior design world. The look and feel of a recycled leather floor is remarkable, and it adds a unique touch of luxury to any environment. There is extensive options in regards to colors, textures, and finishes to suit your particular installation. In a home you can use recycled leather in closets, powder rooms, offices, theaters, bedrooms, dining rooms, ceilings, kitchens, backsplashes and even stair cases!

Those of you with an environmental conscience will appreciate the fact that recycled leather tile is LEED certified. It is made by collecting real leather scraps from furniture, shoe, car and other factories. It’s not only cool looking, but it’s great for the environment as well. One great advantage of using recycled leather tile is that it is easy to install. Leather tiles come with a pre – glued backing. The pre- glued backing allows the tiles to install directly over drywall, primed concrete, or plywood with no further adhesive application. You simply remove the liner and apply the tiles directly to the surface. Installation is hassle-free and completed in minutes.

Leather Floors will wear in a manner similar to a linoleum floor and have indentations comparable to that of a high quality cork floor. These tiles are practical and made with the user in mind while being of uncompromising beauty and texture.  Leather floors over time will develop a rich patina. Their look will improve with age –in a manner similar to the patina developed by a leather sofa. Leather floors will take on the characteristics of their environment, creating a truly unique and personal floor. The care required for a leather floor is similar to what you need to do for a wood floor. Normal maintenance includes, vacuuming with a soft brush, damp mopping with a very well wrung out mop.

Recycled leather tile is attractive, unique and durable, it is an excellent choice for flooring that will add to the value to your home. The look and feel of a leather floor is remarkable…Try it for yourself!

Nocturno Croc Leather Tile

Nocturno Croc Leather Tile

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Tips For Amazing Wall & Floor Textures by Ana Morales

Friday, July 30th, 2010

There are many ways to add textural interest to any room on both floors and walls. With all the amazing tile finishes now available, the possibilities are endless! Here a a few looks to inspire your next project!

Un-Neutralize the Neutral

Neutrals are undeniably serene and soothing. To avoid looking bland, neutrals require a design imperative for their survival: texture. In this room the contrast between the neutral porcelain and the dark cabinetry offers a touch of sophisticated style and texture without being overbearing. By using the same porcelain in a different pattern behind the vanity, the color scheme remains neutral but great visual texture is achieved.

Limestone Grey Porcelain Installation

The Layered Look

Texture can be added from top to bottom in a room for dramatic effect. The trick to layering is to stick to the same color scheme when combining different finishes. To achieve this effect, mix smooth finishes with patterned finishes to achieve a unique look. In this bathroom the uniting background color is white, but the sage green flower patterned porcelain on the wall adds amazing texture without being overwhelming.

Deco Silk Porcelain Tile Installation

Get Floored

If you’re a fan of hardwood floors, a wood grain that boasts a lot of gorgeous grain, brings instant texture. The variations in the wood’s natural color will add a lot of personality to a neutral room, while providing a stunning foundation to the room’s furnishings.

Block Wenge Porcelain Tile Installation

Textural Walls

Texture lovers will revel in the effect created by installing woven finish porcelain. The woven porcelain finish is  very earthy and natural, and looks amazing on any surface. This is a great product that can be installed on any wall or floor to add textural interest.

Yakarta Wenge Porcealin Tile Installation

Faux Stone Finishes

Bathrooms can be a showcase for texture.  If you are looking for something that will be classic but with a modern twist, consider using one of the many faux stone porcelain options that are available. Using a porcelain that is made to look like natural stone in a neutral tone, brings installations from flat to fabulous. This option will give you that same visual pop, without breaking the bank.

Ferroker Laton Porcelain Installation

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